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Monday, April 16, 2018

That time Trump helped the Negro Leagues

On November 4, 1983, veterans of the Negro Leagues, which integration shuttered three decades earlier, met with fans and each other in Ashland, Kentucky.



Hank Aaron, Monte Irvin, Buck Leonard, and Judy Johnson showed up. Bob Feller, too. Not sure why because he was white, but he barnstormed in some post-season white all-stars versus black all-stars games.

It was just a bunch of old men reliving a past that was quite fun, quite trying, and quite a step toward integrating this nation.

The Louisville Courier Journal noted, "Previous reunions have been held during the summer, but this year's was delayed because of financing problems."

But the Alcoa Foundation, the Donald Trump Foundation, and the Ashland Oil Foundation came through.

My question is why didn't Major League Baseball take care of it? Then-commissioner Bowie Kuhn and past commissioner Governor Happy Chandler showed up.

At least Alcoa, Ashland Oil, and Trump did the right thing.

6 comments:

  1. And unfortunately doing the right thing is not all that common in these big Foundations. So hats off to them all.

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  2. Liberals will claim this was a ploy so that in almost 33 years to the day, he would use this to claim he is not a racist in an attempt to be elected President

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  3. The Donald has "the common touch". Liberals don't do "common", because they're "better".

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  4. A good man.

    Plenty of flaws, but still a good man.

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  5. In those days, when race relations were so "bad", before the country was "woke", a bunch of white kids lined up to get their baseball bats autographed by Negro League players they probably had never seen play. Twenty-five years later, the country elected a half-white, half-black president who worked to divide the country along racial lines, and now there are calls for re-segregation by blacks. So why did Rosa Parks need to sit in the front of the bus? Why did civil rights activists just have to sit at the white lunch counters? Was it all for nothing?

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